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“Take advantage of every opportunity to practice your communication skills so that when important occasions arise, you will have the gift, the style, the sharpness, the clarity, and the emotions to affect other people.”
- Jim Rohn

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Helping Child Development Take Off!
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In The Home

Therapy Services provided and performed in the home.

Feeding Clinic

Specialized Feeding and Swallowing therapy performed in our Charlotte and Statesville clinics.

Schools and Daycares

Therapy performed in the school or daycare setting.

What's New

What's New - Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy, Inc.

Occupational Therapist Mary Nguyen joins Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy in the Charlotte area

SLP Elizabeth Cline joins Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy in the Statesville region

Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Stephanie Payne joins Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy in the Statesville and Charlotte areas

New office opens in Statesville at 129 N Tradd Street

Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant Meredith Schoore joins Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy in the Statesville area

Speech Therapist Robin Goldberg joins Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy in the Charlotte area

Occupational Therapist Morgan Jones joins Carolina Speech And Occupational Therapy in the Charlotte area

SLP Heather Harwell joins Carolina Speech And Occupationa Therapy in the Statesville region

Erin Ray, MA CCC-SLP joins the Feeding Center.

Current News

Current News for Carolina Speech Therapy, Inc.

Feeding Development Milestone Chart has now been published(more info)

Recent Events

Recent Events - Carolina Speech and Occupational Therapy, Inc.

New office opens in Statesville at 129 N Tradd Street

The Feeding Center expands to now include Charlotte and Statesville

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is the difference between speech and language?
  2. When should I be concerned if my child is not talking?
  3. Is it normal for my child to not say all words correctly?

What is the difference between speech and language?

  • Speech is comprised of the sounds in our words. A speech delay involves the substitution or deletion of a speech sound that then affects a child’s ability to be understood by others. An example of this would be a child who says /t/ for /k/, so ‘tat’ for ‘cat’. Speech could also include a child who stutters.
    Language is described as the child’s understanding of language spoken and his ability to express himself effectively. It also includes social language skills and the language rules that cover how to organize words into sentences. A typical language delay seen for therapy may be a toddler who is not using words to express wants and needs or difficulty understanding language or following directions.
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When should I be concerned if my child is not talking?

  • By 18 months, if your child is not using at least a few words you should consider pursuing a speech-language evaluation. The earlier a delay can be caught, typically the better the prognosis. By the age of 2, a child should begin putting 2 words together. Talk with your pediatrician about your concerns and/or call to schedule an evaluation.
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Is it normal for my child to not say all words correctly?

  • Speech sounds are typically acquired completely by age 6. Some sounds are later developing sounds (such as /r, s, th, l, and sound blends/) and completely normal for 3 and 4 year olds to not say correctly or to substitute other sounds in their place. By 3, 4, 5 and 6 there are certain sounds that a child should be saying correctly and if they are not, speech therapy may be recommended to address this delay. See our speech sound development chart for specific sound acquisition ages.
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